Food, Agriculture and Plant Biology

Bios Magazine: The Ancient Origin of Photosynthesis

February 04, 2020
The origin of photosynthesis is a tale of biological thievery that started billions of years ago. In this comic, Distinguished Professor John Clark Lagarias walks us through this tale.

Shivering Seeds: Using Gene Trees to Map a Weed’s Ability to Thrive

January 21, 2020
In a study appearing in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, UC Davis researchers used the staple plant model organism Arabidopsis thaliana, known commonly as the thale cress, to uncover the genetic mechanisms that control its seeds responses to chilly weather.

Grains in the Rain: Study Opens the Door to Flood-Resistant Crops

September 19, 2019
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change -- good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity.

A Chemical Lure That Sticks: New Trapping Methods for Citrus Greening Pest

September 09, 2019
The Asian citrus psyllid is the bogeyman of the citrus industry. Its appearance in fields is a dark harbinger for farmers, for carried within this insect is the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter, the cause of citrus greening disease. In a study published in Scientific Reports, UC Davis researchers report that an acetic acid-based, slow-release trap is capable of capturing Asian citrus psyllids even when the insect populations are low.

Chloroplasts, β-Barrel Proteins and Traversing through Graduate School

September 09, 2019
In a new publication in The Plant Cell — “Chloroplast Outer Membrane β-Barrel Proteins Use Components of the General Import Apparatus” — authors Philip Day, Steven Theg, and Kentaro Inoue, all at University of California, Davis, determined how β-barrel proteins are sorted to the correct location in plant chloroplast envelopes, which have two membranes.