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From Molecules to Minds

UC Davis neuroscientists advance learning and memory research to decode how our brains work

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Visualizing “Unfurling” Microtubule Growth

November 13, 2018
Microtubule fibers are hollow rods made of much smaller tubulin subunits that spontaneously assemble at one end of the rod, but exactly how they do this inside the crowded environment of living cells has been a mystery. UC Davis researchers have uncovered the mechanism that puts these blocks in place, illustrated in a new animation.

Social Bee-stortion: Exploring Pesticide’s Effects on Pollinators

November 08, 2018
In a study appearing in Science, researchers show that the pesticide imidacloprid, which has been sold in the U.S. since 1994, disrupts bumblebee (Bombus impatiens) nest behavior, causing reduced growth in exposed colonies.

Exploring the Role of Redox and Bioelectric Players in Tissue Regeneration

November 07, 2018
Seeking a better understanding of limb regeneration, UC Davis researchers are studying the relationship of redox players, like oxygen and hydrogen peroxide, with bioelectricity, including membrane potential and electric currents, to pinpoint how a tadpole can regrow an amputated tail.

Bird Brain Maps: Study Explores the Neuroecology of Flocking in Birds

November 05, 2018
In Frontiers in Neuroscience, researchers provide the scientific community with comprehensive brain maps of the hormone receptors that may be involved in the flocking behaviors of European starlings, house sparrows and rock doves.

Gene Network Lets Plant Roots Handle Nitrogen

October 24, 2018
With robotics, computers and advanced genetics, researchers at the University of California, Davis, and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory have established a core set of genes that help plants metabolize nitrogen, the key to plant growth and crop yield.

UC Davis Research on Gravity Predates Men Landing on the Moon 50 Years Ago

October 16, 2018
NASA has invested millions of dollars in UC Davis research, working with UC Davis biologists, engineers, physiologists, psychologists and other researchers to study life in space — whether that be studying space itself, the effects of gravity, getting there, staying there or surviving there.