Genome Center

Grains in the Rain: Study Opens the Door to Flood-Resistant Crops

September 19, 2019
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change -- good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity.

Microbes Make Chemicals for Scent Marking in a Cat

September 13, 2019
A new study from the Genome Center at the University of California, Davis, shows that many odiferous compounds from a male cat are actually made not by the cat, but by a community of bacteria living in the anal sacs.

Nature Reviews "How to Build a Dragon or Die Trying"

August 19, 2019
Professor Paul Knoepfler, UC Davis Genome Center, studies the epigenetic and transcriptional control mechanisms that direct stem cell fate and tissue growth. He's also a writer, recently co-authoring the book How to Build a Dragon or Die Trying: A Satirical Look at Cutting-Edge Science with his daughter Julie Knoepfler. Helen Pilcher recently reviewed the book in Nature.

Giraffe, Gemsbok Genome Assemblies Add to Map of Life

August 12, 2019
The genomes of wild animals can help us understand how they have adapted to unique situations, give insight into their evolution and help in efforts to protect or restore endangered species. Two examples are recently published chromosome-scale genome assemblies for the Masai giraffe and the gemsbok.

A Menagerie of Model Organisms

May 14, 2019
What can a worm or fish tell us about the human body? When it comes to biology, quite a lot actually. Learn how UC Davis researchers are using animal models to answer basic biological questions that will build the foundation for revolutions in human health in the new feature story "A Menagerie of Model Organisms."

The Language of Biology: How the Heck Do Scientists Assemble a Genome?

March 14, 2019
The genome—the complete suite of an organism’s DNA and genes—is likened to a blueprint for life. On the surface, this comparison provides some understanding of a biological concept. But according to some scientists, it misses the mark.