microtubules

Pew Scholarship Will Investigate Molecular and Cellular Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury

June 14, 2018
Pew Charitable Trusts has announced Kassandra Ori-McKenney as a 2018 Pew Biomedical Scholar, one of the most prestigious honors of its kind. With a four-year grant totaling $300,000, Ori-McKenney will investigate the role of a protein called tau in the development of neurodegenerative disease related to traumatic brain injury.

Perfect Chemistry: CBS Faculty Are Partners In and Outside the Lab

May 21, 2018
After a long day of teaching and research, biochemists Richard McKenney and Kassandra Ori-McKenney usually find themselves on their patio discussing topics like the cytoskeleton and motor proteins. It’s shop talk for the couple, both assistant professors in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology.

Science Says: UC Davis Grad Students Promote Science Communication

February 06, 2018
Founded in 2015 by Distinguished Professor Pamela Ronald, Plant Pathology and the Genome Center, Science Says started as a project funded by the UC Davis Institute for Food and Agricultural Literacy to combat misinformation in food science. Since then, it’s grown into a campus-wide student group.

Understanding Traffic Congestion on the Shifting Roadways of Cell Division

January 23, 2018
In a new study appearing in Developmental Cell, Ruensern Tan, a biochemistry, molecular, cellular and developmental biology graduate student, and Assistant Professor Richard McKenney, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, provide a new molecular model to describe the role of motor proteins in restructuring the cytoskeleton for cell division.

Join Us in Welcoming Dean Mark Winey to the College of Biological Sciences

August 05, 2016
On August 1, Mark Winey began his appointment as dean for the College of Biological Sciences. Winey comes to UC Davis after 25 years at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is a distinguished biologist, an experienced administrator and a strong advocate of biology education at every level.

Molecular Machine, Not Assembly Line, Assembles Microtubules

August 19, 2015
When they think about how cells put together the molecules that make life work, biologists have tended to think of assembly lines: Add A to B, tack on C, and so on. But the reality might be more like a molecular version of a 3-D printer, where a single mechanism assembles the molecule in one go.