neuroscience

From Molecules to Minds

August 14, 2018
How does learning occur? And how do we remember what we learn? UC Davis Center for Neuroscience researchers are asking these questions to learn about the brain.

Jennifer Whistler: On the Search for Safer Opioids

March 08, 2018
As healthcare professionals, pharmaceutical companies, patients and families grapple with the opioid crisis, researchers are rushing to design safer opioids. Center for Neuroscience Associate Director Jennifer Whistler believes drug development is headed in the wrong direction when it comes to opioids. Her solution: design a better drug that mimics the body's natural pain reliever, endorphin.

Biology Grad Student Perspective: New Tax Bill is War on Education

December 01, 2017
UC Davis graduate students gathered Wednesday morning, Nov. 29, outside the Memorial Union, the central hub of campus, to protest tax reform legislation being considered by Congress. The demonstration was part of the “Grad Tax Walkout,” a national event meant to show solidarity against the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, which, if passed, would make graduate education unaffordable for millions of Americans.

Can Diet Help Prevent or Postpone Cognitive Decline?

November 20, 2017
In a review article published in Nature: Science of Food, Professor Raymond Rodriguez and his colleagues explore the relationship between diet and brain health, proposing a framework to understand the body’s “food-brain axis,” the intersection of diet and the formation of new brain cells. Rodriguez’s aim is to provide researchers with a dietary roadmap to help prevent cognitive decline.

Researchers Study How Cochlear Implants Affect Brain Circuits

June 30, 2016
Supported by a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, Corina and Lee Miller, associate professor of neurobiology, physiology and behavior at UC Davis, are working to understand why some children respond better to the implants than others.

Memory Replay Prioritizes High-Reward Experiences

February 11, 2016
Why do we remember some events, places and things, but not others? Our brains prioritize rewarding memories over others, and reinforce them by replaying them when we are at rest, according to new research from the University of California, Davis, Center for Neuroscience, published Feb. 11 in the journal Neuron.