cell biology

Wayward Ways: New Study Reveals How the Nucleus Travels

September 20, 2018
Using CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tools, Dan Starr created mutant versions of the worm C. elegans, to explore how the nucleus moves and repositions itself in the eukaryotic cell.

Plant Cell Study Adds to Protein Trafficking Dogma

August 16, 2018
A new study reexamines how protein trafficking occurs in the chloroplasts of green plants. The findings add nuance to the protein trafficking dogma.

Cholesterol Research from UC Davis Highlighted in PNAS Blog

March 27, 2018

Distinguished Professor Jodi Nunnari, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Marina Besprozvannaya, a postdoctoral researcher, recently published a new study on the movement of cholesterol transporters and other molecules in the scientific journal eLIFE. Their work, along with three other studies, is synthesized in a new blog post on Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences' website.

March of Dimes Award Supports Richard McKenney’s Research into Prenatal Brain Development

March 15, 2018
For more than a decade, Assistant Professor Richard McKenney, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, has dedicated his research to the microscopic world of movement and transportation within cells. Now, a two-year, $150,000 research award from the March of Dimes will support his research to better understand how molecular dysfunction influences prenatal brain development.

Didem Sarikaya Awarded UC President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship

February 23, 2018
For her work, Sarikaya recently received the University of California’s President’s Postdoctoral Fellowship, which is meant to encourage women and minority Ph.D. recipients to pursue academic careers at the University of California.

Guardians of the Genome

UC Davis Researchers Unlock the Genetics of Cancer to Advance the Future of Personalized Medicine by David Slipher For many, breast cancer is more than just a disease – it’s personal. One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer at some point in their lives.