Storer Lectureship in the Life Sciences

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In August 2016, a crowd gathered to celebrate Mel Green's 100th birthday, with lunch and a special Storer Endowment seminar on fly genetics presented by University of Iowa Professor Pamela Geye. Geye became a collaborator of Green's during her postdoctoral studies. David Slipher/UC Davis
In August 2016, a crowd gathered to celebrate Mel Green's 100th birthday, with lunch and a special Storer Endowment seminar on fly genetics presented by University of Iowa Professor Pamela Geye. Geye became a collaborator of Green's during her postdoctoral studies. David Slipher/UC Davis

Communicating Discovery

The Tracy and Ruth Storer Lectureship in the Life Sciences is the most prestigious of the endowed seminars at UC Davis. Established in 1960, the Storer Endowment makes it is possible to invite distinguished biological scientists to campus to present two lectures and meet with faculty members and graduate students in their field of interest. 

History of the Storer Endowment

Tracy I. Storer and Ruth Risdon Storer were alumni of the University of California. They began their affiliation with the Davis campus in 1923 when Tracy I. Storer was appointed assistant professor and assistant zoologist and taught the first campus course in zoology. He became the founding chair of the Department of Zoology. His long and devoted service to science and the University ended with his death in 1973.

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Tracy and Ruth Storer, photographed on Tracy's 80th birthday in 1968. The Storer Lectureship is named in their honor. (Courtesy photo)

Ruth Risdon Storer shared her husband's commitment to furthering scholarship in the life sciences. She was the only woman graduate in the University Medical School class of 1913 and was the first woman pediatrician in Yolo County. She remained active in the Davis community and the University until her death in 1986.

As the donors of the Storer endowment, the Lectureship was originally known as the Alumni Lectureship in the Life Sciences, in accordance with the Storers' desire for anonymity. In 1971, Tracy and Ruth Storer responded to the request of friends and colleagues to allow the University to name the Lectureship in their honor. 

The Tracy and Ruth Storer Lectureship in the Life Sciences serves as a memorial to the Storers' lifetime of service to the University and fulfills their desire that members of the University community continue to enjoy the benefits of association with distinguished visiting scientists.

Today, the Storer Endowment supports the Storer Lectureship in the Life Sciences Series.