neurobiology

Engineering a Balanced Diet? Hormone FGF21 Promotes Protein Preference

May 13, 2019
In a study appearing in Endocrinology, Associate Professor Karen Ryan and her colleagues identified the hormone fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) as a control for regulating dietary protein intake in male mice. They found that male mice injected with the hormone increased their intake of dietary protein over carbohydrates and fats.

Between the Pipes: Club Hockey with Undergraduate Timur Katsnelson

March 12, 2019
Since transferring to UC Davis in fall 2017, Timur Katsnelson has gone all in on the Aggie experience. He’s a member of the UC Davis ice hockey club team, has worked as an undergraduate researcher in a chemistry lab and volunteers as a junior editor with The Aggie Transcript, a student-run life sciences journal.

From Molecules to Minds

August 14, 2018
How does learning occur? And how do we remember what we learn? UC Davis Center for Neuroscience researchers are asking these questions to learn about the brain.

Receptors Key to Strong Memories

February 27, 2018
New research reveals how the patterns of connections between neurons, which form memories, can be strengthened or weakened at a molecular level.

Kim McAllister Leads Center for Neuroscience

August 31, 2017
Kimberley McAllister, a professor in the Departments of Neurology in the School of Medicine and Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior in the College of Biological Sciences has been appointed permanent director of the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience.

Researchers Study How Cochlear Implants Affect Brain Circuits

June 30, 2016
Supported by a five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, Corina and Lee Miller, associate professor of neurobiology, physiology and behavior at UC Davis, are working to understand why some children respond better to the implants than others.

What's Behind the Heartbreaking Risk of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

April 25, 2016
Researchers have known for more than a decade that the risk of heart disease and stroke increases when people take pain relievers like ibuprofen and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs. Now, scientists from the University of California, Davis, have uncovered some of the reasons why these drugs can harm heart tissue.