Population Biology Graduate Group

Shivering Seeds: Using Gene Trees to Map a Weed’s Ability to Thrive

January 21, 2020
In a study appearing in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, UC Davis researchers used the staple plant model organism Arabidopsis thaliana, known commonly as the thale cress, to uncover the genetic mechanisms that control its seeds responses to chilly weather.

Can Scents Create New Species? Smells Like Orchid Bee Evolution

January 13, 2020
To attract a mate, male orchid bees collect scents from the environment to create the perfect aroma. In a study appearing in Nature Communications, UC Davis researchers link the evolution of sexual signaling in orchid bees to a gene that’s been shaped by each species’ perfume preferences

Discovering Curiosity: The Tug of the Tides with Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute Director Richard Grosberg

October 01, 2019
As director of the Coastal and Marine Sciences Institute, Richard Grosberg oversees an interdisciplinary body that includes membership from the College of Biological Sciences, the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, the College of Letters and Science, the College of Engineering, the School of Law, the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Graduate School of Management.

Ancient Splices of Biology: Tracing the Evolution of Insect Sexual Development

September 04, 2019
Sexual determination and differentiation work in myriad ways across the animal kingdom. In vertebrates, like mammals and fish, sexual determination leads to the development of either ovaries or testis. These organs then secrete hormones that go on to govern the sexual development of the rest of the organism’s body. Insects are a completely different beast.

Coast Redwood and Giant Sequoia Mega-Genomes Sequenced

April 23, 2019
Scientists have successfully sequenced the coast redwood and giant sequoia genomes, completing the first major milestone of a five-year project to develop the tools necessary to study these forests’ genomic diversity.