Biochemistry, Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Graduate Group

Crystal D. Rogers

  • Assistant Professor
  • Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Cell Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine
Research Interests: The research in my lab focuses on understanding the genetic mechanisms and environmental factors that control and affect early vertebrate development.
Veterinary Medicine 3B

Li Tian

  • Associate Professor
  • Department of Plant Sciences, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences
Research Interests: Phytonutrient biochemistry and physiology; Biosynthesis, accumulation and function of carotenoids and polyphenols in plants; Targeted improvement of crop phytonutrient composition and content for enhanced nutritional and medicinal values.
Asmundson Hall room 116

Mitochondrial Chitter-Chatter: Unveiling the Molecular Structures of Cellular Respiration

September 03, 2019
In order to generate energy, our bodies transfer electrons from food—sugars, fats and proteins—to molecular oxygen, which allows our cells to respire and function. Performed by the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC), this process creates ATP, the “molecular currency” for energy in the cell. In a Molecular Cell study, Assistant Professor James Letts, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, and colleagues reveal further nuances of the ETC.

Nature Reviews "How to Build a Dragon or Die Trying"

August 19, 2019
Professor Paul Knoepfler, UC Davis Genome Center, studies the epigenetic and transcriptional control mechanisms that direct stem cell fate and tissue growth. He's also a writer, recently co-authoring the book How to Build a Dragon or Die Trying: A Satirical Look at Cutting-Edge Science with his daughter Julie Knoepfler. Helen Pilcher recently reviewed the book in Nature.

The Repellence Cocktail: Mosquito Sense of Smell Reveals More Mysteries

August 01, 2019
While we know certain plant-derived compounds act as insect repellents, much of the molecular science behind insect olfaction remains a mystery. In a study published in iScience, UC Davis researchers exposed further layers of complexity in the mosquito olfactory system.